Atsuta Jingu Shrine, Nagoya

I approached a man near the stairs of a subway exit.  He looked as if he was unsure of where he was.  I walked toward his direction and got a closer look at his face.

“すみません。遅くになりました。携帯電話は家で忘れちゃった。間違い電車を乗りました。ごめんなさい,”I said apologetically.  He didn’t look pissed or disappointed at me.

“何時に来ましたか?,” I asked.

“10時” he replied.

I checked my watch and it was almost 11:00 am.  We were supposed to meet at 10 in the morning, but I forgot my cell phone at my apartment.    Since I mostly rely on my cellphone to find out what train I need to ride here and there, I got on the wrong subway train twice.  I wasn’t expecting him to still be at our meeting place, although I hoped he would be just so I could explain myself.  After I made my way pass the non-optical turnstile at the subway station, I looked for him, but he was nowhere to be found. It was then that I decided to just go through with our initial plan of exploring Atsuta Shrine.

The weather was the opposite of the sunny yesterday.  It was cold and raining.  I crossed the street and that was when I found him.  I actually forgot his real name, but I had no intention of asking him again because it just seemed awkward. And so instead of calling him by his name, I managed to say すみません – which means I’m sorry or Excuse me. It sounded perfect especially in our situation. 

We went around the Atsuta Shrine vicinity while getting lost in translation.   He is at N3  level and I am at N4 in terms of Japanese ability. He couldn’t understand English and so we both communicated in a language that neither of us was highly proficient at.  After sightseeing, we had lunch at a Korean restaurant that I frequent at Kanayama Station.  We were beside a Japanese couple and I just felt uneasy speaking in Japanese beside the natives. While waiting for our food, there were episodes of silence between us, but I didn’t mind.  I just wanted to eat. Probably because of the limited vocabulary that we possess, the question and answer portion was filled with questions one doesn’t normally ask on a first date — the worst was when he asked me how much salary I make!

I felt like the whole situation is just a preview of what dating life would be in case I’d ever date a Japanese man.    After he paid the bill for our lunch, he asked me where I wanted to go next.

“今から帰ります。大丈夫?洗濯をしなければなりません,” I told him just so I could excuse myself.

We parted ways at the station.  I didn’t go home and do laundry as what I mentioned to him.  Instead, I spent the remaining afternoon naked in a big indoor bath tub called onsen with the obaasan in my town.

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This is a ‘yorishiro’ – an object considered sacred.  This sacred tree has a rope called ‘shimenawa’ tied around it for ritual purification.
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Empty sake barrels called Kazaridaru 

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Temizuya water pavilion. You have to rinse your hands and mouth before entering the shrine to purify yourself.
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Atsuta Jingu shrine is the second most important Shinto shrine in Japan after Ise Grand Shrine in Mie Prefecture.

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